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This is really one of those we have to think about... the spare tire rack takes up a big part of the bed, and trading that for the cover is going to increase aerodynamic drag by a lot. Remember Al said in the Overland Bound video the truck is "very aero sensitive", I think that was a purposeful statement to let us know that the aerodynamics are important for range. Al also mentioned keeping the bed cover on for best Aero, twice. I took this as forewarning for if you have the bed open and spare tire in, you are going to take a beating on range, same for the roof racks and front assessory lights. Remember aerodynamic drag does not increase linear with speed, so that spare tire or light bar at 75 mph are going to have a noticeable range penalty (50 to 75 miles?). I also noticed the rack that GM is offering looks to be designed for 2 spare tires?

The more I think about this in the last 30 years I have never used my spare, or done a roadside tire change in any vehicle. When I have had a flat, I pump it and limp to a tire shop or call roadside assistance. Thinking back most of my flats have been at home (nail or screw in the tire) and slow leaks. I have never used the spare tire in any of my GM trucks dating back to 1992. I think I would buy the spare tire, and throw it in the back under the cover if I was going to be in a place with no roadside assistance, and just leave it in the garage the rest of the time. Another thing to think about, jacking up a 9000lb truck on the side of the road in a dirt shoulder (usually sloped) with a small base jack is going to be sketchy to begin with. I think people are going to struggle with this operation.
Yea, I think I would only get that if I were off-roading a lot! And even then if you get the right tires and wheels it’s typically not an issue. Funnily enough, or not so funny I guess, TFL recently took a new Defender off-road and got two flat tires in the same place! The issue was that it had 20” wheels, I believe, which gives less sidewall than 18” wheels. For some reason the off road package for that engine required the bigger wheels. Go figure…
 

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I dont have an edition 1 ordered but these accessory prices are still great info to chew on. I was curious what the sky convertible top was so I'm glad there is a pic. It looks as though once retracted you don't get as much of an open space with that as you do when you just remove the panels.

I am curious how much the transparent panels will cost for any non-Edition one buyers. This will weigh in my decision to upgrade from a 2vx to a 3x. I definitely want to add removable panels and assist steps to whichever one I get.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
it’s hard for me to tell how the cover is mounted, but it would be disappointing if it’s not more integrated as you said. After all they have a patent on an integrated system which is pretty new. Maybe the roll down window interfered in some way? But can you stand on it and it be solar like a Cybertruck? 🤪
It looks similar to a Roll-N-Lock brand cover to me (since they sit above the rails and have a canister that is not flush mounted like a Retrax or Pace Edwards). The below is NOT a Hummer, to be clear.
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This is really one of those we have to think about... the spare tire rack takes up a big part of the bed, and trading that for the cover is going to increase aerodynamic drag by a lot. Remember Al said in the Overland Bound video the truck is "very aero sensitive", I think that was a purposeful statement to let us know that the aerodynamics are important for range. Al also mentioned keeping the bed cover on for best Aero, twice. I took this as forewarning for if you have the bed open and spare tire in, you are going to take a beating on range, same for the roof racks and front assessory lights. Remember aerodynamic drag does not increase linear with speed, so that spare tire or light bar at 75 mph are going to have a noticeable range penalty (50 to 75 miles?). I also noticed the rack that GM is offering looks to be designed for 2 spare tires?

The more I think about this in the last 30 years I have never used my spare, or done a roadside tire change in any vehicle. When I have had a flat, I pump it and limp to a tire shop or call roadside assistance. Thinking back most of my flats have been at home (nail or screw in the tire) and slow leaks. I have never used the spare tire in any of my GM trucks dating back to 1992. I think I would buy the spare tire, and throw it in the back under the cover if I was going to be in a place with no roadside assistance, and just leave it in the garage the rest of the time. Another thing to think about, jacking up a 9000lb truck on the side of the road in a dirt shoulder (usually sloped) with a small base jack is going to be sketchy to begin with. I think people are going to struggle with this operation.
I would rather keep the powered cover and just have a spare that I can throw under it for off-roading, or long trips. Simply strap it down to keep it from moving. Many years ago I had a 1980 3/4 ton 4wd Suburban, a rather big heavy vehicle. I busted tire sidewalls twice while out on some rough trails. I would not want to be without a spare tire in that case.

That tire rack looks like it can be removed, but why did they not make it horizontal? I could easily weld up my own custom mount that would work with a cover, and bolt it to the truck bed like that one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Yea, I think I would only get that if I were off-roading a lot! And even then if you get the right tires and wheels it’s typically not an issue. Funnily enough, or not so funny I guess, TFL recently took a new Defender off-road and got two flat tires in the same place! The issue was that it had 20” wheels, I believe, which gives less sidewall than 18” wheels. For some reason the off road package for that engine required the bigger wheels. Go figure…
The Defender has ~32" tires (255/60R20) so on a 20" wheel you have 6" of sidewall (32-20=12, divide by 2=6"). An 18" wheel is a bit better at 7" of sidewall. Their problems were two-fold. First, even the mud tires available on the Defender are pretty street-oriented, with what appear to be relatively weak sidewalls that don't include rim protection and not a lot of tread block. Second, as you note, the D110 with a V6 is not available with 18" wheels due to the V6 models receiving brakes that won't fit under 18" wheels (19" wheels are available, fwiw). The aftermarket has a kit available to reduce the caliper size, but of course that's not stock. That said, the same tire model in an 18" size would likely have similar issues, and they probably should have (in hindsight) stacked a couple rocks to avoid getting two pinch flats on the same rock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I would rather keep the powered cover and just have a spare that I can throw under it for off-roading, or long trips. Simply strap it down to keep it from moving. Many years ago I had a 1980 3/4 ton 4wd Suburban, a rather big heavy vehicle. I busted tire sidewalls twice while out on some rough trails. I would not want to be without a spare tire in that case.

That tire rack looks like it can be removed, but why did they not make it horizontal? I could easily weld up my own custom mount that would work with a cover, and bolt it to the truck bed like that one.
Or get a hitch-mounted spare like the Wilco (which will eat into your departure angle): Hitchgate™ Offset.
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I would rather keep the powered cover and just have a spare that I can throw under it for off-roading, or long trips. Simply strap it down to keep it from moving. Many years ago I had a 1980 3/4 ton 4wd Suburban, a rather big heavy vehicle. I busted tire sidewalls twice while out on some rough trails. I would not want to be without a spare tire in that case.

That tire rack looks like it can be removed, but why did they not make it horizontal? I could easily weld up my own custom mount that would work with a cover, and bolt it to the truck bed like that one.
Exactly what I was thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Depending on the design though, that could interfere with the multipro tailgate. Not sure, just a concern.
Yeah it's a trailer hitch-mounted swing gate, so it would absolutely interfere with the tailgate (need to swing it out every single time you open the tailgate). Probably also blocks the rearview cameras. Another possible solution is mounting over the bed, but that's worse for your center of gravity, of course.
 

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Rivian has done a damn good job on their truck. It is a little quirky looking from the rear though.. Bed is 54” internally with the tailgate closed and due to the way the tailgate opens and has the sliding panel to fill the gap, you get just shy of 84” of bed length with it down. It’s also a bit over 51” wide between the wheel wells. IMO, the bed on the Rivian is more capable than the bed on the Hummer EV. Not to mention the storage compartment that can hold a full size spare and they have dual 110V 20A power outlets and an integrated air compressor.

Spare tire bed mount on the Hummer EV is just a typical in-bed carrier we see on lots of off-road trucks. Nothing special here. Of course it can hold two tires as most do. The big issue I have with this solution is that it negates using the bed as a truck bed if you’re also trying to carry a spare tire. What a pain in the ass…. With the Hummer EV design as it turned out, there’s really nowhere else to put a full size spare. But I’m not convinced they couldn’t have made the bed a bit longer to under-mount it or found another solution.

I’m still hanging in there with the Hummer reservation until I have to make my final decision and there’s a lot to like — mostly because it’s a freaking Hummer and it’s going to be the best off-road electric truck. Or at least it will be the best until you have to recover all 9000lbs of it from a muddy hillside. For now it looks like F-150 Lightning has the “work truck” role locked down pretty tight. Hummer is all off-road fun. Rivian is kinda in-between with far better storage and many options like power and air that the Hummer doesn’t have. It’s small, but not much smaller than the F-150 when you start really comparing dimensions. F150 is only 15” longer, 2” taller and just under 2” wider. Of that 15” of length vs. Rivian, 6” goes in the bed, almost 3” more rear seat leg room and the rest into the massive frunk. For everyone who keeps talking about how huge the Hummer is, it’s the same width as the F-150 when both have their mirrors folded and length-wise it’s 10” shorter than the F-150 with 6” shorter bed. Height varies due to air suspension, but overall similar.

Hummer has 4-wheel steering and crab walk mode. Rivian can rotate all 4 wheels independently with the quad-motor setup so can do skid-steer/ tank turns. F-150 is an F-150…. But has independent rear suspension now due to the dual motor setup. So driving around without a load on the bed shouldn‘t be so bouncy. Oh, and that integrated bed scale… I know some guys that will use the crap out of that. Personally, I’d mostly use it for mother-in-law jokes, but that’s why I’m still hanging onto my Hummer EV reservation. I’m here for fun. If I needed an all-around work truck, I’d just get the F-150 and re-evaluate the whole thing once the Silverado EV arrives in ’24.
 

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I will probably use a hitch-mount carrier for the spare rather than the in-bed rack. As long as the hitch mount one can swing away just fine. Will still be a hassle if I have to haul things with the tailgate down — an unfortunate reality with a 5ft bed.
 

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The Hummer and an f150 are not the same width unless you are looking at an f150 raptor. The Hummer is 86” without mirrors while a standard F150 is about 80
 

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Rivian has done a damn good job on their truck. It is a little quirky looking from the rear though.. Bed is 54” internally with the tailgate closed and due to the way the tailgate opens and has the sliding panel to fill the gap, you get just shy of 84” of bed length with it down. It’s also a bit over 51” wide between the wheel wells. IMO, the bed on the Rivian is more capable than the bed on the Hummer EV. Not to mention the storage compartment that can hold a full size spare and they have dual 110V 20A power outlets and an integrated air compressor.

Spare tire bed mount on the Hummer EV is just a typical in-bed carrier we see on lots of off-road trucks. Nothing special here. Of course it can hold two tires as most do. The big issue I have with this solution is that it negates using the bed as a truck bed if you’re also trying to carry a spare tire. What a pain in the ass…. With the Hummer EV design as it turned out, there’s really nowhere else to put a full size spare. But I’m not convinced they couldn’t have made the bed a bit longer to under-mount it or found another solution.

I’m still hanging in there with the Hummer reservation until I have to make my final decision and there’s a lot to like — mostly because it’s a freaking Hummer and it’s going to be the best off-road electric truck. Or at least it will be the best until you have to recover all 9000lbs of it from a muddy hillside. For now it looks like F-150 Lightning has the “work truck” role locked down pretty tight. Hummer is all off-road fun. Rivian is kinda in-between with far better storage and many options like power and air that the Hummer doesn’t have. It’s small, but not much smaller than the F-150 when you start really comparing dimensions. F150 is only 15” longer, 2” taller and just under 2” wider. Of that 15” of length vs. Rivian, 6” goes in the bed, almost 3” more rear seat leg room and the rest into the massive frunk. For everyone who keeps talking about how huge the Hummer is, it’s the same width as the F-150 when both have their mirrors folded and length-wise it’s 10” shorter than the F-150 with 6” shorter bed. Height varies due to air suspension, but overall similar.

Hummer has 4-wheel steering and crab walk mode. Rivian can rotate all 4 wheels independently with the quad-motor setup so can do skid-steer/ tank turns. F-150 is an F-150…. But has independent rear suspension now due to the dual motor setup. So driving around without a load on the bed shouldn‘t be so bouncy. Oh, and that integrated bed scale… I know some guys that will use the crap out of that. Personally, I’d mostly use it for mother-in-law jokes, but that’s why I’m still hanging onto my Hummer EV reservation. I’m here for fun. If I needed an all-around work truck, I’d just get the F-150 and re-evaluate the whole thing once the Silverado EV arrives in ’24.
Silverado is tooling up in the factory right now, it will hit the market in late 2022, as a 23 model year vehicle.
 

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The Hummer and an f150 are not the same width unless you are looking at an f150 raptor. The Hummer is 86” without mirrors while a standard F150 is about 80
Yep, I guess I was muddling dimensions. Lighting is 80” excluding mirrors, 83.6” mirrors folded and 96” mirrors out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
F150 is only 15” longer, 2” taller and just under 2” wider. Of that 15” of length vs. Rivian, 6” goes in the bed, almost 3” more rear seat leg room and the rest into the massive frunk.
F-150 has way more rear legroom vs. Rivian (43.6" vs. 36.6" or 38.1" depending on who you reference). Also, massively different hip room in the back (62.6" vs. 54.2").
 

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Each truck has its advantages and disadvantages it all just depends what you’re looking for. Some people need an F150/Silverado some people need a Ranger/Colorado, they both serve different purposes and needs.
 
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