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GMC Global Vice President Duncan Aldred confirmed today that the HUMMER EV Edition One Pickup will have 329 miles of range and that GMC has taken over 60k reservations for the all-electric HUMMER pickup and SUV models.

During an update call with journalists today GMC’s Ducan Aldred gave added insight to the expected range of the forthcoming GMC HUMMER EV Pickup and how many reservations the brand has taken for HUMMER EV vehicles and when the first customers will take delivery.

GMC confirmed that the HUMMER EV Edition 1 Pickup will have 7,500lbs of towing capacity and around 1,300lbs of payload capacity

GMC also confirmed that the HUMMER EV Edition 1 Pickup will be classified as an HD vehicle, precluding them from having to share some fuel economy and range figures on the window sticker.
Wow, GM missed on range, weak payload and less than expected towing.... I predicted about the HD and no EPA rating...


So Rivian R1T hauls more, tows more, range about the same, and the HummerEV is 55% more expensive, hmmm... I might have to reshuffle the deck again.
 

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Wow, GM missed on range, weak payload and less than expected towing.... I predicted about the HD and no EPA rating...


So Rivian R1T hauls more, tows more, range about the same, and the HummerEV is 55% more expensive, hmmm... I might have to reshuffle the deck again.
OOPS, Bad Math, its actually 607 wh/mi
 

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Not disappointed.

Range may not be 400+ miles, but for a vehicle this size, 330 miles is damn good. For the Tesla stans who go "bUt tHe CyBerTrUCk hAs 500 MiLEs"...dude. Come on now.

As far as towing goes, the reality is that it's hardly relevant at all with this type of vehicle. For the same reason no one cares about how much a Wrangler can tow. Non issue.

Payload is the only real loss.
Payload we kind of knew, but the tow rating is surprisingly low...
 

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GMC Global Vice President Duncan Aldred confirmed today that the HUMMER EV Edition One Pickup will have 329 miles of range and that GMC has taken over 60k reservations for the all-electric HUMMER pickup and SUV models.

During an update call with journalists today GMC’s Ducan Aldred gave added insight to the expected range of the forthcoming GMC HUMMER EV Pickup and how many reservations the brand has taken for HUMMER EV vehicles and when the first customers will take delivery.

Duncan Aldred confirmed for the first time that the brand has over 60k reservations for the HUMMER EV. Around 70% of those reservations are for the truck with 30% for the SUV. Out of all reservations, 80% are for Edition 1 models. Overall GMC has over 125k people who have raised their hands to show interest in one of the GMC HUMMER EV models.

GMC confirmed that the HUMMER EV Edition 1 Pickup will have 7,500lbs of towing capacity and around 1,300lbs of payload capacity

GMC also confirmed that the HUMMER EV Edition 1 Pickup will be classified as an HD vehicle, precluding them from having to share some fuel economy and range figures on the window sticker.
Wow, Truck has more reservations than SUV 70% to 30% is a shocker, and 80% of the reservations are edition 1's, so does that mean GM is going to build way more of these than we thought? I was thinking 10K edition 1 trucks and 10K edition 1 SUV's. I will stick with my assumptions until I hear different from GM, GM Trucks has been known to misunderstand data in the past.
 

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If my math is right that's around 48k Edition 1 Vehicles.

On another note about Towing.... would you say the full sized Ford Bronco is a competitor to the Hummer for the off roading space?
I would think yes, yes it is.

Here are it's towing and payload:
Max towing is up to 3,500 pounds
Max Payload is up to 1,370 pounds
Bronco is not a competitor, Rivian R1T is a competitor.. Cybertruck, Etc... This Hummer is basically a paper tiger, expensive, and not very capable as a truck.
 

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No GM was targeting the Raptor, Bronco, and TRX with their truck. They had no thought of the other EVs. Look at the Easter Eggs found in the truck, the off roading specs, the size.
Only we are comparing the other EVs in the market and they are all targeting different segments, the Cyber Truck is still not even close to coming out.
First of all, GM launched this HummerEV program 2 weeks after Rivian left them at the alter, this was most certainly launched as an answer to the Rivian R1T (just like BrightDrop was an answer to the Rivian Van). Rivian succeeded in creating a better balanced vehicle and that has broader range of capabilities, and for far less $$.


Sad, I think GM missed the target on capabilities. This Hummer might compete with ICE competitors but the EV competition will blow it away.
 

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So with the edition 1 with the most power being able to tow 7500, does that mean the 3X and lesser models will have lower tow ratings?
Typically the limiting factor on tow ratings is the Tongue weight limit, so in this case lesser equipped models should offer more towing, I would assume SUT's with smaller battery packs the the rear modules of the battery will be removed first, increasing payload and towing.
 

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I don't believe they are making 30k or more edition 1 trucks..
I remember members reporting back even just a couple months after the first reservations were offered and there was 10 ev3 or better reservations for every 1 reservation at the dealerships. Anyone care to call about 5 different dealerships and see how many edition 1s trucks they are getting versus overall hummer reservations ???? I bet it's more than 10 to 1 by now...
I think the data was misreported, GM has Hummer set up for low production and only 1 shift, no way will they build 30K in the next 12 months. Batteries are being built on a pilot line at Brownsfield currently, a few hundred a month, tops... Lordstown will not come online until Q3, per reports.
 

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I had my Rivian, since cancelled, up to 90K without the kitchen. But it did not include a removable roof, which they have not released any info on yet. Yes it had 400 mile range, but much smaller bed and just a standard tailgate.

It is hard to compare the two directly, because the feature set is different. And Rivian is currently stuck with 400V architecture for charging, not really state of the art for a company that is entirely EV.
Tesla also 400V charging... It works and All of Tesla's current models add range faster then the Hummer EV...
 

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This kind of option, like tent, kitchen and whatnot shouldn’t be factored in a vehicle to vehicle price tag comparison imho. If you plan to have one anyway, Rivian is one seller, but you could find other one for the Hummer on the aftermarket etc. To hit the 90k you’ve also probably added the extra long range battery which then brings the EPA range to 400, which beats the Hummer, for less price.
Don’t get me wrong, I wish I was a Ev1 holder, but I also think Tom has a point.
Not sure if the configurator for rivian is behind the paywal or not, but if that's the case and you want to run down some numbers I can help with mine.
Ya, and the HummerEv should be optioned up, GM makes you pay extra for footwell lights, puddle lights, etc, etc, etc...
 

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It remains to be seen what the charging rate will be for the Cybertruck. I think you are comparing apples to oranges, car versus a truck. Reports from a couple of Rivian owners indicate 187kW peak rate. Tesla is able to charge at 250kW because they are pushing 625A through a very short cable. Ford is also targeting the Lightning to be 400V and only 150kW charging. At least the new Sierra/Silverado are also supposed to be 800V and they will be more efficient than the Hummer.

How about comparing the Tesla charging rates to Lucid or the new Hyundai's.
Going back to the discussion, Hummer Ev charging curve remains to be seen, but the Hummers, massive lack of efficiency will not help things, it looks like it will be more expensive than a diesel on a road trip.

Tesla recent Model S charges comparable to a Lucid, just sightly slower in miles per minute, but faster than Taycan, and the Hyundai models.
 

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Tom I’m not very familiar with charge rates. To me a 300 mile EV is a 300 mile EV. How much are you thinking the Hummer will cost to charge when not at home? If I currently have an 18mpg car and pay $3.50 a gallon for gas it would cost me about $58 to drive the car for 300 miles. Do you think the Hummer will cost about $58 per charge? For some other EVs around that range wouldn’t they be just as innefficient?
Depending on the electricity cost where you live, will vary what it costs to charge at home. I live in the land of cheap electricity, 10 cents per kWh, so for me assuming the Hummer Ev is empty, 200 kWh plus 10% for charging losses, an at home charge $22, charging on a DC fast charger on a road trip using Electrify America as an example is .43, per KWh, or .31 if you have a monthly paid subscription, so for most people .43. DC charging also has a higher charging loss rate as more heat is generated, so let's use 15% which is about average, so the charge will cost you $99, as a non member, or $71 as a paid subscription member. Remember though the 329 miles is in mixed driving per the EPA cycle (avg 48 mph) so highway at 70MPH will yield much higher consumption in a aerodynamically challenged vehicle like the HummerEV, I think at 70 mph you 275 miles would be a more likely target, and at 80 mph, 200 miles would be a stretch.

This will be interesting when we get some real data on the Hummer's highway range, I expect we will see a much higher drop-off than other vehicles as speed increases due to increased aerodynamic drag of the vehicle compared to other EV's.

Another thing to note, is GM not EPA certifying the Hummer, I guess they are embarrassed abut the numbers because the EPA also gives drivetrain efficiency numbers, as well as highway and city loop split, and charging losses. EPA calculates their final number on power from the plug required to complete the loop. This confused many people on the Rivian numbers.

My comparison is my diesel pickup 2020 GMC Denali 2500HD, which carries 36 gallons of fuel, and cross country on a road trip, will pull 22mpg at 70 mph. I have seen as low at 20.5, and as high as 25.2, calculated, not trusting GM's instrumentation. TFLT tested them in 2019, and averaged about he same.
 

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Depends on the charger, some cost per kWh while others cost per time spent charging.
Have to see what the networks around you cost.

As an example here are EVGO's prices: EV Charging Costs: Pricing and Plan for EV Charging

Select your region in the above link.

Also it's best practice to charge between 20% to 80% during your stops as it's much faster and you don't always need to charge up to 100% unless you are starting a trip.
You are partially correct, you want to arrive at your DC charger with as low a state of charge as you dare, I typically shoot for around 10%, in all EV's other then E-Tron this matters because the charging curve is much higher as the bottom of the pack. Every EV is slightly different for this strategy, but if you are really trying to make the best trip time, you are going to run it much lower, arriving at charging stops at 5% or less and charging to 50%, then move on to the next charger. In The Hummer EV 20-80% would only net you 60% or about 150 miles at highway speed, and 20-80% will not net the best charging speed.
 
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