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Wow that's a big step for GM. Considering the amount of EVs they want to produce it seems doable. The biggest hurdle they have to overcome making the supply chain carbon neutral.

A Science-Based Approach

General Motors is committed to reaching carbon neutrality in its global products and operations by 2040, supported by a commitment to science-based targets. To reach its goals, GM plans to decarbonizeⁱⁱⁱ its portfolio by transitioning to battery electric vehicles or other zero-emissions vehicle technology, sourcing renewable energy and leveraging minimal offsets or creditsⁱⁱⁱⁱ.

Electrification

The use of GM's products accounts for 75 percent of carbon emissions related to this commitment. GM will offer 30 all-electric models globally by mid-decade and 40 percent of the company's U.S. models offered will be battery electric vehicles by the end of 2025. GM is investing $27 billion in electric and autonomous vehicles in the next five years – up from the $20 billion planned before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This investment includes the continued development of GM's Ultium battery technology, updating facilities such as Factory ZERO in Michigan and Spring Hill Manufacturing in Tennessee to build electric vehicles from globally sourced parts and investing in new sites like Ultium Cells LLC in Ohio as well as manufacturing and STEM jobs.

More than half of GM's capital spending and product development team will be devoted to electric and electric-autonomous vehicle programs. And in the coming years, GM plans to offer an EV for every customer, from crossovers and SUVs to trucks and sedans.

The company will also continue to increase fuel efficiency of its traditional internal combustion vehicles in accordance with regional fuel economy and greenhouse gas regulations. Some of these initiatives include fuel economy improvement technologies, such as Stop/Start, aerodynamic efficiency enhancements, downsized boosted engines, more efficient transmissions and other vehicle improvements, including mass reduction and lower rolling resistance tires.

Renewable Energy

To address emissions from its own operations, GM will source 100 percent renewable energy to power its U.S. sites by 2030 and global sites by 2035, which represents a five-year acceleration of the company's previously announced global goal. Today, GM is the 10th largest offtaker of renewable energy in the world and in 2020, the company received a 2020 Green Power Leadership Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Carbon Offsets and Credits

To account for the expected remaining carbon emissions, GM expects to invest in carbon credits or offsets. The company will assess credit and offset solutions in the coming years as the most efficient, equitable and inclusive ideas mature. The company recognizes that offsets must be used sparingly and should reflect a holistic view of mitigating the effects of climate change and helping people thrive around the world.

Supply Chain and Infrastructure

GM's carbon neutral commitment applies to its global product portfolio and owned operations. The company is implementing plans today to reduce the impact associated with its supply chain while supporting grids and utilities to power electric vehicles with renewable energy. GM has worked with some of its largest suppliers to create a sustainability council to share best practices, learn from each other and create new standards for the industry. In addition to the council's work, GM is collaborating with suppliers to set ambitious targets for the supply chain to reduce emissions, increase transparency and source more sustainable materials.

While electric vehicles themselves do not emit tailpipe emissions, it is critical that they be charged with electricity generated from renewable sources like wind and solar. GM has worked with utilities and developers to support investments in renewable energy found in and around communities that have GM facilities via power purchase agreements and green tariffs. The company is also working with EVgo to triple the size of the nation's largest public fast charging network by adding more than 2,700 new fast chargers by the end of 2025, a move set to help accelerate widespread electric vehicle adoption. The new fast chargers will be powered by 100 percent renewable energy. GM believes that the energy sector is well on its way to a decarbonized grid and that an all-electric future will be supported by renewable infrastructure and technology.
 

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The timing of this couldn't be better with what Biden presented, that is an aggressive effort to "Buy American" and replace the government's vehicle fleet with electric vehicles assembled in the U.S.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow that's a big step for GM. Considering the amount of EVs they want to produce it seems doable. The biggest hurdle they have to overcome making the supply chain carbon neutral.

A Science-Based Approach

General Motors is committed to reaching carbon neutrality in its global products and operations by 2040, supported by a commitment to science-based targets. To reach its goals, GM plans to decarbonizeⁱⁱⁱ its portfolio by transitioning to battery electric vehicles or other zero-emissions vehicle technology, sourcing renewable energy and leveraging minimal offsets or creditsⁱⁱⁱⁱ.

Electrification

The use of GM's products accounts for 75 percent of carbon emissions related to this commitment. GM will offer 30 all-electric models globally by mid-decade and 40 percent of the company's U.S. models offered will be battery electric vehicles by the end of 2025. GM is investing $27 billion in electric and autonomous vehicles in the next five years – up from the $20 billion planned before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This investment includes the continued development of GM's Ultium battery technology, updating facilities such as Factory ZERO in Michigan and Spring Hill Manufacturing in Tennessee to build electric vehicles from globally sourced parts and investing in new sites like Ultium Cells LLC in Ohio as well as manufacturing and STEM jobs.

More than half of GM's capital spending and product development team will be devoted to electric and electric-autonomous vehicle programs. And in the coming years, GM plans to offer an EV for every customer, from crossovers and SUVs to trucks and sedans.

The company will also continue to increase fuel efficiency of its traditional internal combustion vehicles in accordance with regional fuel economy and greenhouse gas regulations. Some of these initiatives include fuel economy improvement technologies, such as Stop/Start, aerodynamic efficiency enhancements, downsized boosted engines, more efficient transmissions and other vehicle improvements, including mass reduction and lower rolling resistance tires.

Renewable Energy

To address emissions from its own operations, GM will source 100 percent renewable energy to power its U.S. sites by 2030 and global sites by 2035, which represents a five-year acceleration of the company's previously announced global goal. Today, GM is the 10th largest offtaker of renewable energy in the world and in 2020, the company received a 2020 Green Power Leadership Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Carbon Offsets and Credits

To account for the expected remaining carbon emissions, GM expects to invest in carbon credits or offsets. The company will assess credit and offset solutions in the coming years as the most efficient, equitable and inclusive ideas mature. The company recognizes that offsets must be used sparingly and should reflect a holistic view of mitigating the effects of climate change and helping people thrive around the world.

Supply Chain and Infrastructure

GM's carbon neutral commitment applies to its global product portfolio and owned operations. The company is implementing plans today to reduce the impact associated with its supply chain while supporting grids and utilities to power electric vehicles with renewable energy. GM has worked with some of its largest suppliers to create a sustainability council to share best practices, learn from each other and create new standards for the industry. In addition to the council's work, GM is collaborating with suppliers to set ambitious targets for the supply chain to reduce emissions, increase transparency and source more sustainable materials.

While electric vehicles themselves do not emit tailpipe emissions, it is critical that they be charged with electricity generated from renewable sources like wind and solar. GM has worked with utilities and developers to support investments in renewable energy found in and around communities that have GM facilities via power purchase agreements and green tariffs. The company is also working with EVgo to triple the size of the nation's largest public fast charging network by adding more than 2,700 new fast chargers by the end of 2025, a move set to help accelerate widespread electric vehicle adoption. The new fast chargers will be powered by 100 percent renewable energy. GM believes that the energy sector is well on its way to a decarbonized grid and that an all-electric future will be supported by renewable infrastructure and technology.
Yes, but when you look at GM's supply chain, Ultium LLC is + or - 50% of the cost content of upcoming EV's, and GM should have pretty good control of Ultium LLC since they are 50% partners. Some other suppliers might be more difficult to work with, especially ones that do not believe in the benefits of being carbon neutral. I love it though, looking at GM from an investment standpoint, they are definitely on the right track.
 

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This is shocking, honestly. I know GM has been touting EV's for quite a while now, but to eliminate all ICE light duty cars by 2035? That's a gamble.

There have been a number of prominent engineers voicing concern with auto manufacturers moving ahead at light speed on EVs. A lot of it has to do with tech advancements, obviously, but some of it also has to do with things outside the industry's control. For example, certain Canadians and Alaskans...these people live in frigid climates 24/7. An EV will have terrible range in those climates, and ICE is perfectly suited for their lifestyles. Now, a lot can change in 15 years, but it's a reality to be dealt with.

I think this is unquestionably the greatest gamble in the history of General Motors. Other than Tesla, no one has gotten out to a bigger lead in EV tech than GM, and this all happens when the EV market is entirely unproven. If they are moving too fast, this could be one epic collapse...but if the gamble takes off and EVs explode in popularity, GM will go through a period of glory unlike it's ever seen (including the 50's and 60's), and may even become the world's leading auto brand once again. I always root for GM, they've been my passion since I was a kid. Time will tell!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is shocking, honestly. I know GM has been touting EV's for quite a while now, but to eliminate all ICE light duty cars by 2035? That's a gamble.

There have been a number of prominent engineers voicing concern with auto manufacturers moving ahead at light speed on EVs. A lot of it has to do with tech advancements, obviously, but some of it also has to do with things outside the industry's control. For example, certain Canadians and Alaskans...these people live in frigid climates 24/7. An EV will have terrible range in those climates, and ICE is perfectly suited for their lifestyles. Now, a lot can change in 15 years, but it's a reality to be dealt with.

I think this is unquestionably the greatest gamble in the history of General Motors. Other than Tesla, no one has gotten out to a bigger lead in EV tech than GM, and this all happens when the EV market is entirely unproven. If they are moving too fast, this could be one epic collapse...but if the gamble takes off and EVs explode in popularity, GM will go through a period of glory unlike it's ever seen (including the 50's and 60's), and may even become the world's leading auto brand once again. I always root for GM, they've been my passion since I was a kid. Time will tell!
The cars to me are a no brainer, it's more the trucks that present a challenge. I m not sure what they will do on the HD trucks for long haul fleet customers. I have seen guys that put 200K miles a year on pickups, all towing trailers, How are they going to fulfill this customers needs?
 

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The cars to me are a no brainer, it's more the trucks that present a challenge. I m not sure what they will do on the HD trucks for long haul fleet customers. I have seen guys that put 200K miles a year on pickups, all towing trailers, How are they going to fulfill this customers needs?
Agreed 100%. I assume this press release is implying that the HD trucks will still be running off gas and diesel in 2035, which makes sense. We have a family landscape and construction business, and our trucks take an absolute beating all year round, GMCs and Fords. Hauling skid steers, gravel, plant material, equipment, plowing, it's very real abuse. You know all about that being a contractor. I don't see them going away any time soon.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Agreed 100%. I assume this press release is implying that the HD trucks will still be running off gas and diesel in 2035, which makes sense. We have a family landscape and construction business, and our trucks take an absolute beating all year round, GMCs and Fords. Hauling skid steers, gravel, plant material, equipment, plowing, it's very real abuse. You know all about that being a contractor. I don't see them going away any time soon.
Yes, we are hard on our trucks, at, or over max capacity often, but the other issue is having an EV requires planning, charge, routes, etc, and towing at max capacity I think EV range drops dramatically 350 miles in the Hummer EV will become 120 miles with a skid steer, or mini excavator behind... maybe less. The other factor is you never arrive at a worksite with 100% charge, so that 120 miles is a bigger issue. I think I can make it work for myself because I only tow when our planning went wrong, and I need to move a mini, or garbage trailer in an emergency, but if there was no diesel pickup for sale, that would not be good for productivity. Maybe GM thinks fuel cell tech is right for the HD pickups, but Hydrogen has been the right answer for 50 years, and still not in scaled production.
 

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This is shocking, honestly. I know GM has been touting EV's for quite a while now, but to eliminate all ICE light duty cars by 2035? That's a gamble.

There have been a number of prominent engineers voicing concern with auto manufacturers moving ahead at light speed on EVs. A lot of it has to do with tech advancements, obviously, but some of it also has to do with things outside the industry's control. For example, certain Canadians and Alaskans...these people live in frigid climates 24/7. An EV will have terrible range in those climates, and ICE is perfectly suited for their lifestyles. Now, a lot can change in 15 years, but it's a reality to be dealt with.

I think this is unquestionably the greatest gamble in the history of General Motors. Other than Tesla, no one has gotten out to a bigger lead in EV tech than GM, and this all happens when the EV market is entirely unproven. If they are moving too fast, this could be one epic collapse...but if the gamble takes off and EVs explode in popularity, GM will go through a period of glory unlike it's ever seen (including the 50's and 60's), and may even become the world's leading auto brand once again. I always root for GM, they've been my passion since I was a kid. Time will tell!
They won't the only ones doing this. Nissan is apparently setting a similar deadline for themselves.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
They won't the only ones doing this. Nissan is apparently setting a similar deadline for themselves.

This is good, more EV choice... there is no one size fits all. Now we need the government to rollout a plan for charging infrastructure. Or just give grants and low interest loans to private business to do it.
 

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This is good, more EV choice... there is no one size fits all. Now we need the government to rollout a plan for charging infrastructure. Or just give grants and low interest loans to private business to do it.
Definitely, the gap between EV tech and charging infrastructure is insane.
 
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