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General Motors President Mark Reuss wrote an article on LinkedIn about GM's roadmap towards electrification.

Their development agreement with SolidEnergy Systems for their next-generation Ultium battery system should a great move for their batteries going forward.


Every day I come to work, either in the office or the home office, excited. And that’s because the pace of change seems to accelerate each day. Every day, we’re moving General Motors, and the world, closer to an all-electric future.

That might sound dramatic, but it’s true. It’s exciting to see the progress we’re making toward that goal, and exciting to consider the prospect of bringing the world and its drivers along with us. And we’re doing it because it’s good for the company, good for our customers, and good for our planet.

Climate change is a real problem, and an urgent one. An all-electric future is essential to addressing it.

To get to an all-electric future – not just an all-electric GM lineup – we need to get consumers as excited about it as we are, and we need to ensure communities make the necessary changes to be ready. GM will do our part, but we cannot do it alone.

I’d like to share my view on what that roadmap to an all-electric future needs to include.

1. Battery technology breakthroughs that make EVs more affordable and faster to charge. Our Ultium technology platform is already enabling batteries that charge faster, go farther on a charge and require less expensive materials. Today, I’m thrilled to share news that represents another improvement to affordability and range, two major concerns when it comes to mass EV adoption. We have a new joint-development agreement with lithium metal battery innovator SolidEnergy Systems that will drive our next-generation Ultium battery system to an industry-first combination of affordability, high performance and energy density.

Our first-generation Ultium-based products go on sale later this year, and we’ve accelerated the timeline for several of the vehicles, as we work toward having 30 EVs globally by 2025.

2. Getting Communities Ready. We have real work in the next five years and beyond to get communities ready to support mass adoption of EVs.

Our current EV owners say charging is convenient – much like plugging in a smartphone for a charge at home or at work. But we have a long way to go before cities have charging infrastructure so all EV owners can charge fast and easy at home, at work and on-the-go. We’re doing what we can to move the needle, but it’s going to take public and private partnerships to get our communities ready, such as our partnership with EVgo to add 2,300 fast-charging stations in cities and suburbs.

There is also real opportunity to green the grid and invest in this critical infrastructure so that it can power an all-electric future at all times – even the worst of times.

3. Smart and effective public policy. It’s great that we’ve seen growing enthusiasm for an all-electric future from federal, state and local policymakers because we need them to achieve this bold vision.

Several key policy elements would help the U.S. lead in electrification:
  • Investing in infrastructure that includes fast-charging stations, particularly in urban areas and along highway corridors. This will help give consumers the confidence to buy.
  • Consumer incentives, including a modification to the EV tax credit so that customers of first movers like GM are not penalized, and also one that makes used EV buyers eligible.
  • Investment tax credits to incentivize companies to establish manufacturing capacity in the U.S. and to help build out the U.S. supply chain.
4. Creating Confident and Excited Consumers. To be sure, many ingredients are needed in the recipe for success, but the most important one will be terrific EVs that people love and adopt as a primary daily driver, one that won’t have them pining for conventional internal combustion vehicles.

Anyone who knows me knows how I feel about cars and driving. Enthusiast is almost an understatement. That’s why I’m the least worried about this element of a roadmap to an all-electric future. I’m here to tell you … EVs are a blast to drive. I’ve been driving our new Chevrolet Bolt EUV, and I love it. I have no doubt that when more people have a chance to drive an EV, they won’t want to go back.

2021 is the tipping point toward EVs. That’s what we believe and that’s what I believe – and we are committed to making it happen. And as we all know by now, a lot can happen in a year.
 

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General Motors President Mark Reuss wrote an article on LinkedIn about GM's roadmap towards electrification.

Their development agreement with SolidEnergy Systems for their next-generation Ultium battery system should a great move for their batteries going forward.


Every day I come to work, either in the office or the home office, excited. And that’s because the pace of change seems to accelerate each day. Every day, we’re moving General Motors, and the world, closer to an all-electric future.

That might sound dramatic, but it’s true. It’s exciting to see the progress we’re making toward that goal, and exciting to consider the prospect of bringing the world and its drivers along with us. And we’re doing it because it’s good for the company, good for our customers, and good for our planet.

Climate change is a real problem, and an urgent one. An all-electric future is essential to addressing it.

To get to an all-electric future – not just an all-electric GM lineup – we need to get consumers as excited about it as we are, and we need to ensure communities make the necessary changes to be ready. GM will do our part, but we cannot do it alone.

I’d like to share my view on what that roadmap to an all-electric future needs to include.

1. Battery technology breakthroughs that make EVs more affordable and faster to charge. Our Ultium technology platform is already enabling batteries that charge faster, go farther on a charge and require less expensive materials. Today, I’m thrilled to share news that represents another improvement to affordability and range, two major concerns when it comes to mass EV adoption. We have a new joint-development agreement with lithium metal battery innovator SolidEnergy Systems that will drive our next-generation Ultium battery system to an industry-first combination of affordability, high performance and energy density.

Our first-generation Ultium-based products go on sale later this year, and we’ve accelerated the timeline for several of the vehicles, as we work toward having 30 EVs globally by 2025.

2. Getting Communities Ready. We have real work in the next five years and beyond to get communities ready to support mass adoption of EVs.

Our current EV owners say charging is convenient – much like plugging in a smartphone for a charge at home or at work. But we have a long way to go before cities have charging infrastructure so all EV owners can charge fast and easy at home, at work and on-the-go. We’re doing what we can to move the needle, but it’s going to take public and private partnerships to get our communities ready, such as our partnership with EVgo to add 2,300 fast-charging stations in cities and suburbs.

There is also real opportunity to green the grid and invest in this critical infrastructure so that it can power an all-electric future at all times – even the worst of times.

3. Smart and effective public policy. It’s great that we’ve seen growing enthusiasm for an all-electric future from federal, state and local policymakers because we need them to achieve this bold vision.

Several key policy elements would help the U.S. lead in electrification:
  • Investing in infrastructure that includes fast-charging stations, particularly in urban areas and along highway corridors. This will help give consumers the confidence to buy.
  • Consumer incentives, including a modification to the EV tax credit so that customers of first movers like GM are not penalized, and also one that makes used EV buyers eligible.
  • Investment tax credits to incentivize companies to establish manufacturing capacity in the U.S. and to help build out the U.S. supply chain.
4. Creating Confident and Excited Consumers. To be sure, many ingredients are needed in the recipe for success, but the most important one will be terrific EVs that people love and adopt as a primary daily driver, one that won’t have them pining for conventional internal combustion vehicles.

Anyone who knows me knows how I feel about cars and driving. Enthusiast is almost an understatement. That’s why I’m the least worried about this element of a roadmap to an all-electric future. I’m here to tell you … EVs are a blast to drive. I’ve been driving our new Chevrolet Bolt EUV, and I love it. I have no doubt that when more people have a chance to drive an EV, they won’t want to go back.

2021 is the tipping point toward EVs. That’s what we believe and that’s what I believe – and we are committed to making it happen. And as we all know by now, a lot can happen in a year.
Mark slipped something about Hummer EV range yesterday that was reported by InsideEv, the wording is not clear, but the number 450 caught my eye. There was no context given, and no confirmation, but if GM is over 400 miles with Hummer EV Edition 1 EPA range, that will be amazing. Especially since Tesla is not having any luck going much beyond 400 miles, and has again delayed the 520 mile Model S Plaid + 6-9 months. I think Tesla is struggling with their new 4680 battery production, Cybertruck delay coming next?

 

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Mark slipped something about Hummer EV range yesterday that was reported by InsideEv, the wording is not clear, but the number 450 caught my eye. There was no context given, and no confirmation, but if GM is over 400 miles with Hummer EV Edition 1 EPA range, that will be amazing. Especially since Tesla is not having any luck going much beyond 400 miles, and has again delayed the 520 mile Model S Plaid + 6-9 months. I think Tesla is struggling with their new 4680 battery production, Cybertruck delay coming next?

If they Edition one can get 450 that bodes very well for the lower trim models coming after.
 

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The 450 mile statement given some time ago, was not related to the Hummer. When GM announced the Ultium battery, it initially indicated the 200KWH pack would provide "up to" 400 miles of range. At the same time, Hummer was announced with 350 miles, since it is a very heavy vehicle. Since then GM announced that the Ultium is performing better than initially expected for energy density (i.e. >200KWH for same package), so now they believe 450 is possible (12% improvement). That means the Hummer could end up close to 400 miles with that improved energy density.

When GM releases the new Silverado and Sierra trucks, they will be lighter than the Hummer and will likely be able to get the 450 miles on lower level models, such as single motor versions.
 

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The 450 mile statement given some time ago, was not related to the Hummer. When GM announced the Ultium battery, it initially indicated the 200KWH pack would provide "up to" 400 miles of range. At the same time, Hummer was announced with 350 miles, since it is a very heavy vehicle. Since then GM announced that the Ultium is performing better than initially expected for energy density (i.e. <200KWH for same package), so now they believe 450 is possible (12% improvement). That means the Hummer could end up close to 400 miles with that improved energy density.

When GM releases the new Silverado and Sierra trucks, they will be lighter than the Hummer and will likely be able to get the 450 miles on lower level models, such as single motor versions.
Hummer EV SUT Edition 1 was announced with 350 + miles of range, I think that "plus" is going to come into play. However in the InsideEV article Mark Reuss is quoted saying GM is close to 450 miles with the Hummer EV. This is very interesting, I would guess the Hummer will have consumption around 500 wh/mi, which calculates to close to 400 miles, but GM also said the battery is bigger than 200 kWh. Here is the line that caught my attention in the InsideEv article.

Reuss says they are approaching 450 miles of range with the upcoming GMC Hummer EV
 
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