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Discussion Starter #1
GM has given us a small taste about home much power the electric Hummer is going to have.

According to their press release, it will have:
  • 1,000 horsepower
  • 11,500 lb/ft of torque
  • 0-97 km/h (0-60 mph) in 3 seconds
Based on these numbers this Hummer is going to come with MASSIVE batteries and is going to be very heavy. It also leads me to believe that it's going to have at least a dual-motor setup, but hopefully it'll have a quad-motor one.
 

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1,000 horsepower and 11,500 lb/ft torque is just absurd to me. Do you think that torque number is what we'll actually get at the wheels??
 

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1,000 horsepower and 11,500 lb/ft torque is just absurd to me. Do you think that torque number is what we'll actually get at the wheels??
Automobile Magazine gives an interesting breakdown trying to unpack that 11,500 lb/ft torque number. They believe that the Hummer will have a 4 motor setup with 250 horsepower at each wheel. For torque they say it's how it's delivered, so each engine could either have 2,875 lb-ft if they were direct drive or 295 lb-ft if they use the same 9.73:1 reduction ratio Tesla uses in the Model S.

Now, let's unpack the whole 1,000 horsepower and 11,500-lb-ft torque ratings. Those are new, and both seem really huge, right? A number as high as that lb-ft figure is bound to represent torque applied at all four tires. Since the industry doesn't typically quote torque figures that have been multiplied through any transmission and axle gearing (i.e., for engines, we quote torque from the engine, before it is multiplied by, say, a torque converter), we figure that GMC's Hummer will fit four electric motors, one per wheel, with each rated for 250 horsepower. As for each motor's torque, that figure depends on how it's delivered to each wheel. If the motors were direct-drive in-wheel hub units, that'd mean each one would produce a whopping 2,875 lb-ft; if each motor were instead mounted inboard and spun a half-shaft axle through the same 9.73:1 reduction ratio Tesla uses in the dual-motor Model S (as an example), the torque rating would be a much more "normal" sounding 295 lb-ft per motor.
 
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