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GM recently attended a demonstration of Delta Electronics’ new 400 kW EV fast charger system, which promises a range of benefits and will help to bolster the EV charging infrastructure.

Delta Electronics seeks to produce innovative, clean, and energy-efficient solutions to create the EV charging infrastructure of the future. To that end, the company has developed a next-generation SiC MOSFET solid state transformer (SST)-based 400 kW extreme EV charger system that can provide charging current up to 500 Amps.

The new technology was shown at a recent demonstration event attended by Delta Electronics’ key program partners, including GM. The demonstration was made in conjunction with the GMC Hummer EV. To note, the Hummer EV includes DC fast charging capabilities up to 350 kW.

“We appreciate the opportunity to participate in the development of Delta’s advanced charging system,” said the director of Electrification Strategy at GM, Tim Grewe. “The results are encouraging, and we look forward to continued collaboration as we work toward an all-electric future.”

The new technology is expected to accelerate EV adoption by addressing issues like range anxiety and long charge times. In addition to providing 500 amps of charging current, the new Delta Electronics EV fast charger tech provides grid-to-vehicle energy efficiency as high as 96.5 percent, while the system itself weighs four times less than conventional DC EV chargers. What’s more, the technology integrates systems that are essential for smart grid applications, including reactive power compensation for voltage stabilization. The HVDC power architecture also enables a connection with renewable energy and energy storage systems to lessen the impact on the broader electricity grid during high EV charging demand.

The deployment of this new technology coincides with GM’s overarching vision of zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion. GM hopes to reach an annual EV production capacity of 1 million units in North America by 2025.

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GM recently attended a demonstration of Delta Electronics’ new 400 kW EV fast charger system, which promises a range of benefits and will help to bolster the EV charging infrastructure.

Delta Electronics seeks to produce innovative, clean, and energy-efficient solutions to create the EV charging infrastructure of the future. To that end, the company has developed a next-generation SiC MOSFET solid state transformer (SST)-based 400 kW extreme EV charger system that can provide charging current up to 500 Amps.

The new technology was shown at a recent demonstration event attended by Delta Electronics’ key program partners, including GM. The demonstration was made in conjunction with the GMC Hummer EV. To note, the Hummer EV includes DC fast charging capabilities up to 350 kW.

“We appreciate the opportunity to participate in the development of Delta’s advanced charging system,” said the director of Electrification Strategy at GM, Tim Grewe. “The results are encouraging, and we look forward to continued collaboration as we work toward an all-electric future.”

The new technology is expected to accelerate EV adoption by addressing issues like range anxiety and long charge times. In addition to providing 500 amps of charging current, the new Delta Electronics EV fast charger tech provides grid-to-vehicle energy efficiency as high as 96.5 percent, while the system itself weighs four times less than conventional DC EV chargers. What’s more, the technology integrates systems that are essential for smart grid applications, including reactive power compensation for voltage stabilization. The HVDC power architecture also enables a connection with renewable energy and energy storage systems to lessen the impact on the broader electricity grid during high EV charging demand.

The deployment of this new technology coincides with GM’s overarching vision of zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion. GM hopes to reach an annual EV production capacity of 1 million units in North America by 2025.

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The article doesn't explain the true innovation with these new chargers. Here is the most important part of the original Delta announcement:

said Richard Mueller, DTE Energy Technology, Standards and Interconnection manager. “A key aspect of the new technology is the ability to connect directly to medium voltage distribution and provide faster, more efficient charging compared to lower voltage chargers. This project will give DTE and its project partners significant insight into how these fast chargers can be integrated safely, reliably and with ever growing numbers into the grid.”


Delta XFC 400 kW charger announcement

Almost all fast charging stations have a conventional 480 VAC 3 phase service from the utility. The utility routes a buried (relatively) small-gauge 12 kV circuit to a massive transformer, which then converts it to 480 volts. Huge conductors then feed the 480 VAC power to a massive switchboard, with big breakers, and more massive conductors going to the charger electronics cabinets, which have to then convert the 480 VAC to 300-900 VDC power and send it to the dispensers. These new chargers eliminate the transformer, massive utility 480 VAC conductors, massive switchboard, and massive 480 VAC charge station feeders to the power electronics. This chops out several power losing elements, a lot of physical "stuff" on-site, and a ton of $.

Instead, the small-gauge 12 KV utility feeders go directly to a small, HV AC distribution panel with HV breakers integral with the charge station power electronic cabinets. The power electronics act as "solid state transformers" to convert the 12 kV power directly to 300-1000 VDC power to feed to the EV dispensers. Simple electrical service, small conductors, no transformer, and bump the grid-to-EV efficiency from 90% up to 96%. A win-win-win. Utility easier installation, charging system owner (lower cost installation + lower operating costs), charging system host (less real estate required for charging infrastructure, and EV driver (higher available charging voltages, lower net charging costs).
 

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The article doesn't explain the true innovation with these new chargers. Here is the most important part of the original Delta announcement:

said Richard Mueller, DTE Energy Technology, Standards and Interconnection manager. “A key aspect of the new technology is the ability to connect directly to medium voltage distribution and provide faster, more efficient charging compared to lower voltage chargers. This project will give DTE and its project partners significant insight into how these fast chargers can be integrated safely, reliably and with ever growing numbers into the grid.”

Delta XFC 400 kW charger announcement

Almost all fast charging stations have a conventional 480 VAC 3 phase service from the utility. The utility routes a buried (relatively) small-gauge 12 kV circuit to a massive transformer, which then converts it to 480 volts. Huge conductors then feed the 480 VAC power to a massive switchboard, with big breakers, and more massive conductors going to the charger electronics cabinets, which have to then convert the 480 VAC to 300-900 VDC power and send it to the dispensers. These new chargers eliminate the transformer, massive utility 480 VAC conductors, massive switchboard, and massive 480 VAC charge station feeders to the power electronics. This chops out several power losing elements, a lot of physical "stuff" on-site, and a ton of $.

Instead, the small-gauge 12 KV utility feeders go directly to a small, HV AC distribution panel with HV breakers integral with the charge station power electronic cabinets. The power electronics act as "solid state transformers" to convert the 12 kV power directly to 300-1000 VDC power to feed to the EV dispensers. Simple electrical service, small conductors, no transformer, and bump the grid-to-EV efficiency from 90% up to 96%. A win-win-win. Utility easier installation, charging system owner (lower cost installation + lower operating costs), charging system host (less real estate required for charging infrastructure, and EV driver (higher available charging voltages, lower net charging costs).
But does this affect the ability to use battery storage to even out the demand charges?
 

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The article doesn't explain the true innovation with these new chargers. Here is the most important part of the original Delta announcement:

said Richard Mueller, DTE Energy Technology, Standards and Interconnection manager. “A key aspect of the new technology is the ability to connect directly to medium voltage distribution and provide faster, more efficient charging compared to lower voltage chargers. This project will give DTE and its project partners significant insight into how these fast chargers can be integrated safely, reliably and with ever growing numbers into the grid.”


Delta XFC 400 kW charger announcement

Almost all fast charging stations have a conventional 480 VAC 3 phase service from the utility. The utility routes a buried (relatively) small-gauge 12 kV circuit to a massive transformer, which then converts it to 480 volts. Huge conductors then feed the 480 VAC power to a massive switchboard, with big breakers, and more massive conductors going to the charger electronics cabinets, which have to then convert the 480 VAC to 300-900 VDC power and send it to the dispensers. These new chargers eliminate the transformer, massive utility 480 VAC conductors, massive switchboard, and massive 480 VAC charge station feeders to the power electronics. This chops out several power losing elements, a lot of physical "stuff" on-site, and a ton of $.

Instead, the small-gauge 12 KV utility feeders go directly to a small, HV AC distribution panel with HV breakers integral with the charge station power electronic cabinets. The power electronics act as "solid state transformers" to convert the 12 kV power directly to 300-1000 VDC power to feed to the EV dispensers. Simple electrical service, small conductors, no transformer, and bump the grid-to-EV efficiency from 90% up to 96%. A win-win-win. Utility easier installation, charging system owner (lower cost installation + lower operating costs), charging system host (less real estate required for charging infrastructure, and EV driver (higher available charging voltages, lower net charging costs).
Now we just need EVs that directly use medium voltage to charge.
 

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But does this affect the ability to use battery storage to even out the demand charges?
Good point. That wasn’t mentioned but should ideally be integrated w/ the charger electronics at the point where the SST rectifies the 12 KV AC to 12 kV DC. The battery storage BMS charge controller could have a two-way pack-voltage DC -to-12 kV DC converter to allow power to flow to/from the pack to the charger, but not backfeed to the grid. That converter would require the same MOSfets as the charger. Delta does utility scale battery storage systems, too, so they probably already have that option in the mix. The idea is to keep big conventional utility transformers and 480 VAC switchgear/conductors out of the equation. Stations would need a small conventional AC service for lights, control power, etc. That could also be sourced from the host store, truck stop, etc.
 

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Good point. That wasn’t mentioned but should ideally be integrated w/ the charger electronics at the point where the SST rectifies the 12 KV AC to 12 kV DC. The battery storage BMS charge controller could have a two-way pack-voltage DC -to-12 kV DC converter to allow power to flow to/from the pack to the charger, but not backfeed to the grid. That converter would require the same MOSfets as the charger. Delta does utility scale battery storage systems, too, so they probably already have that option in the mix. The idea is to keep big conventional utility transformers and 480 VAC switchgear/conductors out of the equation. Stations would need a small conventional AC service for lights, control power, etc. That could also be sourced from the host store, truck stop, etc.
I continue to wonder about using Super Capacitors instead of batteries to save and deliver the power as fast as possible.
 

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I continue to wonder about using Super Capacitors instead of batteries to save and deliver the power as fast as possible.
Those are only good for short bursts, not for long term storage. The rectifiers from AC to DC already use capacitors. The issue with demand charges is not about having a burst of power, it is about having the power during peak usage hours, for example in Arizona the power company measures demand from 3 to 7pm, one hour is not a short period. So all the power used within one of those hours counts against the demand charge. To smooth out demand charges for a 4 hour period at a busy charger site, even with just 4 chargers, would take something like a 1mwh storage battery.
 

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Those are only good for short bursts, not for long term storage. The rectifiers from AC to DC already use capacitors. The issue with demand charges is not about having a burst of power, it is about having the power during peak usage hours, for example in Arizona the power company measures demand from 3 to 7pm, one hour is not a short period. So all the power used within one of those hours counts against the demand charge. To smooth out demand charges for a 4 hour period at a busy charger site, even with just 4 chargers, would take something like a 1mwh storage battery.
Most of the things I've seen commercially are like 150kWh for a single station. Those stations are designed so that they can be configured to feed off of a standard single phase 240V connection in areas where three phase isn't available. They're terrible to use after they've been depleted because they are trying to both charge up the station and your vehicle.

I think we'll primarily see this type of medium voltage charger being run by the actual power company since they don't have to charge themselves demand charges and will have better control over the output.
 

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Most of the things I've seen commercially are like 150kWh for a single station. Those stations are designed so that they can be configured to feed off of a standard single phase 240V connection in areas where three phase isn't available. They're terrible to use after they've been depleted because they are trying to both charge up the station and your vehicle.

I think we'll primarily see this type of medium voltage charger being run by the actual power company since they don't have to charge themselves demand charges and will have better control over the output.
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Most of the things I've seen commercially are like 150kWh for a single station. Those stations are designed so that they can be configured to feed off of a standard single phase 240V connection in areas where three phase isn't available. They're terrible to use after they've been depleted because they are trying to both charge up the station and your vehicle.

I think we'll primarily see this type of medium voltage charger being run by the actual power company since they don't have to charge themselves demand charges and will have better control over the output.
DC chargers should not be installed in areas without 480V 3 Phase, 150kW charger off of a single phase is 625 amps, would need massive wires feeding the station to handle that current. That is very inefficient, and areas with only single phase are usually residential.
 

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DC chargers should not be installed in areas without 480V 3 Phase, 150kW charger off of a single phase is 625 amps, would need massive wires feeding the station to handle that current. That is very inefficient, and areas with only single phase are usually residential.
I didn't mess up my units. The stations I'm talking about can be used in area where there isn't 3 phase and they have 150 kWh of battery storage as a buffer.
 

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I didn't mess up my units. The stations I'm talking about can be used in area where there isn't 3 phase and they have 150 kWh of battery storage as a buffer.
Most of the country has 3 phase power available, not sure of any areas we need DC chargers that don't have 3 phase access?
 
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