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I was wondering, since we are about to start building our new home, where you think the is ideal location for the wall charger? And for those of you who have multiple EVs, should I plan the wiring for 2 chargers? I am just trying my best to get as much right and future-proof as possible. I know that many say that you should plug in each night, but if you have 2 EVs and only 1 charger do you swap? And the Hummer charges in the rear, but the new Equinox charges in the front...
 

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I was wondering, since we are about to start building our new home, where you think the is ideal location for the wall charger? And for those of you who have multiple EVs, should I plan the wiring for 2 chargers? I am just trying my best to get as much right and future-proof as possible. I know that many say that you should plug in each night, but if you have 2 EVs and only 1 charger do you swap? And the Hummer charges in the rear, but the new Equinox charges in the front...
I'm leaning on setting up quite a big garage on our next build where I can park diagonally in it, we plan to have a twin charger setup between two parking spaces to allow my wife or I to park in either space forwards or backwards depending on car configuration.

Unless all the "hype" about hydrogen is real, definitely account and build for 2 EVs. They aren't going away and I'd wager in the next 10 years that's about all anyone will be buying/driving.

Perhaps you could look at a pedestal type installation between the two (or three) parking spaces in your new home and/or put something on the back wall centrally located between the parking spaces so you could drive in forwards or backwards in either space with either car and accommodate where the charging port is.
 

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I have two EVs and two chargers, keep them always plugged in for battery conditioning in the Arizona heat. I would definitely wire the house for two. Chargers come with 25 foot cords, so I would try to locate the wires where they could reach either a front or rear charge port, if that is possible. You can always back one of the vehicles in as well.
 

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I was wondering, since we are about to start building our new home, where you think the is ideal location for the wall charger? And for those of you who have multiple EVs, should I plan the wiring for 2 chargers? I am just trying my best to get as much right and future-proof as possible. I know that many say that you should plug in each night, but if you have 2 EVs and only 1 charger do you swap? And the Hummer charges in the rear, but the new Equinox charges in the front...
My opinion is to put it on the back wall opposite to where you pull in. I thought I was being smart putting it halfway between the garage door and the back wall to give me flexibility to either pull in straight or back in and still charge but having it on the side of the truck is a pain to get to with the truck being as wide as it is. Unless you will have a decent walking aisle, I would plan for a charger on the back wall of anywhere you would plan to have a car park. Most chargers come with 25 foot cords and most garages are 24 feet or less in length so I think you would be fine having it centered where the vehicle parks unless you plan for a super long garage.

The other thought would be on the side but toward the back wall of the garage so you can reach it without having to walk around the truck.
 

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We have a two car garage with 2 doors. I installed one on the center column between the doors and the other on the left wall (looking from outside) near the garage door. This allows the full left side of each vehicle to be accessed, as well as the right rear corners, without being an obstacle to get past on the way into the house. This also makes the cables accessible under the garage doors if family or friends need a charge.
 

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One 14-50 per bay, hardwire at least one for a higher amperage. Front or back of the garage doesn't matter as long as the cables are the full length allowed by the spec. Choose a brand of EVSE that allows power sharing so you don't need a dedicated service just for a large garage.

There are some that ceiling mount and have drop cords, but I haven't used any so can't offer advice about doing it that way.
 

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Any concerns driving over the charge cords? I’m guessing it’s not advised, but I could see that becoming a routine in our house if both vehicles are plugged in.
They are all supposed to be rated to be driven over, but definitely don't park on them, and make sure they aren't coiled up or overlapping themselves.
 

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I put in two 240v outlets in my new 3-bay garage: A 60A on the far side with the Clipper Creek (and NEMA 14-50R plug in case I need to disconnect it). The cord will reach the Hummer EV in either of two bays. I also added an 80A in the middle with a disconnect. I plan to use it for a welder until if/when it's needed for a second charger. We ordered a Lyriq for my wife, but I'm not sure we'll ever need to charge both EVs at the same time. I also added another 240v outlet in a second home, but since it was a retrofit and 6-guage wire is not the easiest to work with, I just put it as close to the service panel as possible! For that one, I added an A/C disconnect box so when it's not in use, I can disconnect it for safety.
 

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I’m not sure what he used, however he did say it was 60 amp wire just like what was coming off the charger.
To all...watch today's IEVS podcast where (starting at 1:01:45) Tom discusses in detail the difference between hooking up circuits for standard residential appliances vs hooking up circuits for AC high-amp-charging. He frowns on solid-wire romex. Recommends THHN in conduit or a metal-jacketed cable, probably stranded conductors with industrial crimp terminations. It's not just the wire gauge...contact resistance at the terminations can play a big part, too, both with creating heat and remaining tight through repeated expansion/contraction process when the terminations heat up over time. The connection torques, outlet grade, bending radius, etc also play a big part. It's enough put the fear of God in you, especially if you DYI'ed your installation using Home Depot components.
 
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