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I am not sure what Rivian's pack looks like in the van, its different then the R1T, but with cylindrical cells its easy to set up a different config. I would think Amazon told Rivian what they wanted for Range. Rivian van looks a lot better too. Brightdrop said the average Fed Ex is 120 miles a day
Per GM's Brightdrop Zevo 600 order guide, it comes standard with the 20-module Ultium pack. That means just 4 modules less than the Hummer's so probably has about 175 kWh usable. The 600 is the van GM just drove for 250 miles on a single charge between NYC and DC. Rivian's equivalent would require their max pack, which it appears they aren't yet producing. The Zevo also is AWD standard with a FWD primary drive unit and the Ultium small induction motor secondary RWD, which keeps the delivery floor low and flat. And a photo of a 600 being assembled shows it has the same cabin HVAC refrigerant heating/cooling coil heat pump connections that @Dark-Fx's frunk photo showed, meaning better winter cabin heating and winter range. It is a compelling E-delivery van, already temporarily in small-volume construction at Kuka's MI facility and scheduled for high-volume production this Nov. at CAMI.
 

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The Zevo 600 will likely always come standard with AWD. We have to let go of what we know about light passenger EVs when discussing commercial Class 3 EV city delivery van drive trains. The 600 as-spec’ed is optimal for this duty, regardless of expected road-conditions. Here’s why:
  • The 600 has 11,000 lb max GVWR including a 2,200 lb payload. That’s Hummer territory. It carries a full-size Hummer SUV 20-module pack, probably weighing 2,500 lb. But instead of 1,000 HP, it only has 300 HP, using the Ultium EV 180 kW FWD and 62 kW RWD drive units. Same as what likely will go into an Equinox AWD. Back-of-the-envelope 0-60 mph calc using the spec’ed gear ratios, etc. suggests about 11 seconds. This is no over-powered vehicle. Without the RWD supplementing the FWD, it likely could be considered “under-powered”.
  • City/suburban EV delivery vans don’t typically do a lot of highway miles. They realize optimal range efficiency when they can recovery maximum regenerative brake energy during their normal drive cycle: Drive from distribution center to delivery zone. Accelerate for 100 feet, brake for 100 feet. Stop. Repeat 200 times. With 11,000 lbs spread out on a 15’ wheelbase, you can’t just rely on the front axle alone to handle 100% braking and regen duty. The rear axle has to contribute at least 30% to maintain proper dynamic balance. You want to capture every wH of that braking energy. Therein, add a small RWD drive unit.
  • GM’s Ultium AWD assist drive unit is dirt cheap. A 62 kW induction motor (no expensive permanent magnets). It appears to have a co-axial output shaft configuration similar to the Bolt’s (and Lucid’s) to simplify half-shaft installation and minimize drive unit volume. It does not appear to use Lucid’s Swiss-watch-precision coaxial planetary gear arrangement though, but less-expensive double-reduction helical gears off to one side.
  • When in highway-mode, the FWD can propel the van and the RWD unit largely gets out of the way. With an non-magnetic induction rotor, the inverter can turn “off”, letting the rotor free-spin. The only additional energy losses are rotor windage and internal bearing and gear tooth friction losses.
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