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Check out the new article on CNBC regarding the number of Hummer reservations.


What I found interesting is the current 95 percent conversion rate from reservations to sales. This is just another data point indicating the popularity of EVs.
How many do you think have sold, I think 100 or less, hardly usable data. How many of these first 100 are already sold or for sale? Can you say brokers and flippers?
 

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How many do you think have sold, I think 100 or less, hardly usable data. How many of these first 100 are already sold or for sale? Can you say brokers and flippers?
Do you not like any good news coming from GM? There are other forums for Rivian and Tesla. Of course there are some brokers and flippers in those numbers. GM gets paid no matter who buys them. It's the market we're in. It's not a problem unless you see Hundreds sitting on the lot with discounts on them. Otherwise, GM is selling all they can make at this point.
 

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As of last week, there were only 67 delivered to customers!
It's near the end of the quarter so we'll get the numbers soon enough. Battery availability is going to be the limiter until the fall when the cell plant starts production. GM can make two Lyriq packs for each Hummer pack so they will have to decide Lyriq sales volume or Hummer profitability.
 

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Don't tell my wife but I am trying to figure out how I can justify keeping the Hummer now that the R1T came in.
Does this mean you were supposed to choose one to keep/sell the other, or that you want to keep the Hummer and not the R1T (curious re: spousal negotiations for future reference as well as vehicle preference :)).
 

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Do you not like any good news coming from GM? There are other forums for Rivian and Tesla. Of course there are some brokers and flippers in those numbers. GM gets paid no matter who buys them. It's the market we're in. It's not a problem unless you see Hundreds sitting on the lot with discounts on them. Otherwise, GM is selling all they can make at this point.
Don't get me wrong, I like the HummerEv, and GM, but neither are perfect. I think its better to be critical of your team so they learn and get better, if people act like everything GM (insert any manufacture) is doing perfect and great, the company does not move forward. for years GM has squandered their position and now Mary Barra talking about GM being a leader in EV is nonsense, nothing could be less true as GM has had to recall every BEV they have made for the last 5 years, and put their customers through a tough time, and its mostly because they did not do enough validation on LG's product, ya, LG the company they are now joined at the hip with in future battery project. I am not sure doing the giant pouch cells that make up the Ultium system are the right way to go, as its really hard to keep pouch cells restrained (they move as they charge and discharge), and the cell has a much greater distance to the center from the cooling plate, which leaves potential for hot spots in individual cells that are hard to detect by the BMS, also once a pouch cell starts to enter a failure or thermal runaway they is no stopping or even slowing it. Bigger and more energetic pouch cells such as used in Ultium could turn out to be a huge mistake for many technical reasons. Cylindrical cells seem easier/ faster to manufacture, cheaper, and safer as they do not fold the layers on top of each other and have a metal can to contain them and keep them dimensionally stable. Cylindrical cell packs like Tesla also have a small fuse on each cell where if the cell overheats the fuse breaks and the cell is offline, hopefully prior to thermal runaway. Tesla pats are also filled with fireproof foam between the cells and in the case that a cell overheats it is able to distribute the heat without a fire (theoretically) The Ultium pack has none of these redundancies and if a Cell gets hot, boom, its gone. Ultium relies on perfectly made cells, which I wonder if is a realistic strategy in mass manufacturing? Obviously LG has struggled with this, having major recalls on the Kona EV' and Bolt EV which cells were made in 2 different plants on 2 different continents. Have you noticed Legacy makers going to pouch cells, start ups doing cylindrical cells? Hmmm, I wonder if it is the lazy engineers at traditional OEM's that cannot figure out how to build packs of small cylindrical cells in scale and cost? Tesla struggled with this for 2 years, and Rivian is struggling with it now, but Tesla solved the problem and has gone on to scale battery packs beyond the rest of the EV market combined. This is a big risk for GM, if they get their wrong, its a serious setback, thats why the fire recently at Milford is a shocking event, clearly a car in test, and that could be a refreshed Bolt, or worse an Ultium pack. Again when cells have no redundancy against bad manufacturing, its risky... How about GM LS/LT engines lifters and valves over the last 5 years, that is a train wreck, and I assure its easier to make perfect lifters than it is to make perfect battery cells. Go read Mary Barra's tweets and all the GM customers reaching out for help with lifter and valve problems in brand new truck and SUV's.
 

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Does this mean you were supposed to choose one to keep/sell the other, or that you want to keep the Hummer and not the R1T (curious re: spousal negotiations for future reference as well as vehicle preference :)).
"Why do you need to buy another EV truck when you already have one?" I expected to like the R1T better, but it's practically apples and oranges. Caveat is that I haven't used either to tow anything yet.

Doesn't help that it's the third EV I've bought in the past six months...
 

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"Why do you need to buy another EV truck when you already have one?" I expected to like the R1T better, but it's practically apples and oranges. Caveat is that I haven't used either to tow anything yet.

Doesn't help that it's the third EV I've bought in the past six months...
I mean according to the above post, it sounds like you'll NEED the R1T for when the Hummer catches on fire and separately you'll need the Hummer for when the fancy, overly complicated McLaren suspension on the Rivian fails!
 

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I mean according to the above post, it sounds like you'll NEED the R1T for when the Hummer catches on fire and separately you'll need the Hummer for when the fancy, overly complicated McLaren suspension on the Rivian fails!
HummerEV catching fire is a risk, and would be a disaster for Gm if it were to happen. It took Bolt 3 years and over 50K built to start having fires, so we will have to wait and see. Personally I see pouch batteries as higher risk than Cylindrical cells, but then again I am not a battery engineer, so do not know exactly how to qualify the risk, but Bolt is the only reference point I have for GM.
 

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HummerEV catching fire is a risk, and would be a disaster for Gm if it were to happen. It took Bolt 3 years and over 50K built to start having fires, so we will have to wait and see. Personally I see pouch batteries as higher risk than Cylindrical cells, but then again I am not a battery engineer, so do not know exactly how to qualify the risk, but Bolt is the only reference point I have for GM.
Volt had pouch cells. The only issue was the first model year where the pack wasn't adequately protected from a side impact. Not the same cells as the Bolt though. I think GM really tried cutting costs as much as they could for the Bolt.
 

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Volt had pouch cells. The only issue was the first model year where the pack wasn't adequately protected from a side impact. Not the same cells as the Bolt though. I think GM really tried cutting costs as much as they could for the Bolt.
Volt only used the battery 30% to 70% SOC, I had one, 10 kWh usable out of 16 kWh.

Elon Musk says pouch cells are dangerous, and he is more qualified to discuss that than I am. Tesla has used cylindrical, and prismatic and avoided pouch.
 

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HummerEV catching fire is a risk, and would be a disaster for Gm if it were to happen. It took Bolt 3 years and over 50K built to start having fires, so we will have to wait and see. Personally I see pouch batteries as higher risk than Cylindrical cells, but then again I am not a battery engineer, so do not know exactly how to qualify the risk, but Bolt is the only reference point I have for GM.
Chevy Bolt EV owner here: one of the reasons I’m “upgrading” to a Hummer EV is because the Ultium battery is supposed to remedy the ”catching fire” problem the Bolts have seen. So wish me luck lol
 

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Chevy Bolt EV owner here: one of the reasons I’m “upgrading” to a Hummer EV is because the Ultium battery is supposed to remedy the ”catching fire” problem the Bolts have seen. So wish me luck lol
Did you get your new battery yet? My first one last just over 100K miles and now I have my new one, got it back in December.
 

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Don't get me wrong, I like the HummerEv, and GM, but neither are perfect. I think its better to be critical of your team so they learn and get better, if people act like everything GM (insert any manufacture) is doing perfect and great, the company does not move forward. for years GM has squandered their position and now Mary Barra talking about GM being a leader in EV is nonsense, nothing could be less true as GM has had to recall every BEV they have made for the last 5 years, and put their customers through a tough time, and its mostly because they did not do enough validation on LG's product, ya, LG the company they are now joined at the hip with in future battery project. I am not sure doing the giant pouch cells that make up the Ultium system are the right way to go, as its really hard to keep pouch cells restrained (they move as they charge and discharge), and the cell has a much greater distance to the center from the cooling plate, which leaves potential for hot spots in individual cells that are hard to detect by the BMS, also once a pouch cell starts to enter a failure or thermal runaway they is no stopping or even slowing it. Bigger and more energetic pouch cells such as used in Ultium could turn out to be a huge mistake for many technical reasons. Cylindrical cells seem easier/ faster to manufacture, cheaper, and safer as they do not fold the layers on top of each other and have a metal can to contain them and keep them dimensionally stable. Cylindrical cell packs like Tesla also have a small fuse on each cell where if the cell overheats the fuse breaks and the cell is offline, hopefully prior to thermal runaway. Tesla pats are also filled with fireproof foam between the cells and in the case that a cell overheats it is able to distribute the heat without a fire (theoretically) The Ultium pack has none of these redundancies and if a Cell gets hot, boom, its gone. Ultium relies on perfectly made cells, which I wonder if is a realistic strategy in mass manufacturing? Obviously LG has struggled with this, having major recalls on the Kona EV' and Bolt EV which cells were made in 2 different plants on 2 different continents. Have you noticed Legacy makers going to pouch cells, start ups doing cylindrical cells? Hmmm, I wonder if it is the lazy engineers at traditional OEM's that cannot figure out how to build packs of small cylindrical cells in scale and cost? Tesla struggled with this for 2 years, and Rivian is struggling with it now, but Tesla solved the problem and has gone on to scale battery packs beyond the rest of the EV market combined. This is a big risk for GM, if they get their wrong, its a serious setback, thats why the fire recently at Milford is a shocking event, clearly a car in test, and that could be a refreshed Bolt, or worse an Ultium pack. Again when cells have no redundancy against bad manufacturing, its risky... How about GM LS/LT engines lifters and valves over the last 5 years, that is a train wreck, and I assure its easier to make perfect lifters than it is to make perfect battery cells. Go read Mary Barra's tweets and all the GM customers reaching out for help with lifter and valve problems in brand new truck and SUV's.
Don't get me wrong, I like the HummerEv, and GM, but neither are perfect. I think its better to be critical of your team so they learn and get better, if people act like everything GM (insert any manufacture) is doing perfect and great, the company does not move forward. for years GM has squandered their position and now Mary Barra talking about GM being a leader in EV is nonsense, nothing could be less true as GM has had to recall every BEV they have made for the last 5 years, and put their customers through a tough time, and its mostly because they did not do enough validation on LG's product, ya, LG the company they are now joined at the hip with in future battery project. I am not sure doing the giant pouch cells that make up the Ultium system are the right way to go, as its really hard to keep pouch cells restrained (they move as they charge and discharge), and the cell has a much greater distance to the center from the cooling plate, which leaves potential for hot spots in individual cells that are hard to detect by the BMS, also once a pouch cell starts to enter a failure or thermal runaway they is no stopping or even slowing it. Bigger and more energetic pouch cells such as used in Ultium could turn out to be a huge mistake for many technical reasons. Cylindrical cells seem easier/ faster to manufacture, cheaper, and safer as they do not fold the layers on top of each other and have a metal can to contain them and keep them dimensionally stable. Cylindrical cell packs like Tesla also have a small fuse on each cell where if the cell overheats the fuse breaks and the cell is offline, hopefully prior to thermal runaway. Tesla pats are also filled with fireproof foam between the cells and in the case that a cell overheats it is able to distribute the heat without a fire (theoretically) The Ultium pack has none of these redundancies and if a Cell gets hot, boom, its gone. Ultium relies on perfectly made cells, which I wonder if is a realistic strategy in mass manufacturing? Obviously LG has struggled with this, having major recalls on the Kona EV' and Bolt EV which cells were made in 2 different plants on 2 different continents. Have you noticed Legacy makers going to pouch cells, start ups doing cylindrical cells? Hmmm, I wonder if it is the lazy engineers at traditional OEM's that cannot figure out how to build packs of small cylindrical cells in scale and cost? Tesla struggled with this for 2 years, and Rivian is struggling with it now, but Tesla solved the problem and has gone on to scale battery packs beyond the rest of the EV market combined. This is a big risk for GM, if they get their wrong, its a serious setback, thats why the fire recently at Milford is a shocking event, clearly a car in test, and that could be a refreshed Bolt, or worse an Ultium pack. Again when cells have no redundancy against bad manufacturing, its risky... How about GM LS/LT engines lifters and valves over the last 5 years, that is a train wreck, and I assure its easier to make perfect lifters than it is to make perfect battery cells. Go read Mary Barra's tweets and all the GM customers reaching out for help with lifter and valve problems in brand new truck and SUV's.
Ultium Cells Selects Honeywell Quality Control System For State-Of-The-Art Lithium-Ion Battery Production Plant

System will allow for traceable quality across the Ultium Cells production plant
 
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